Friday, November 6, 2009

Old Fort Harrod, Harrodsburg, KY


As you know, George and I love to hike and search for new waterfalls. BUT--we also love history. George especially reads --and remembers---alot of history especially around the Civil War time. It is so interesting to be somewhere with him because he knows so much about our pioneers and what happened in the past.

We love to travel on the back roads (instead of the interstate) when we can. SO--once we left Indiana on 3/10/07, we drove down through the bluegrass region in Kentucky. Talk about GORGEOUS!!! When we got to a town called Harrodsburg, we read a sign saying that it was the FIRST Kentucky settlement. It was then called Harrodstown--and was founded in 1774 as the first permanent English settlement west of the Allegheny Mountains.


After getting into Harrodsburg, we passed by an old fort (Old Fort Harrod). At that time, we both said, "Let's turn around and check it out." AND--are we glad we did!!!! We got to experience life and history first hand in this full-scale replica of the fort, built by James Harrod. The cabins and blockhouses are furnished with handmade utensils used by the pioneers.


James Harrod was the unanimous choice to be the leader of the expeditionary company that founded Kentucky's first settlement. He was an expert in the use of a rifle, a successful hunter, and a skillful antagonist of the Native American. He was a feared enemy to them, yet he was highly respected by them. Harrod joined George Rogers Clark's expedition to destroy Shawnee strongholds across the Ohio River. The expedition was successful and more settlers came to the peaceful, lush Kentucky territory. Colonel James Harrod died mysteriously during one of his hunting trips in the winter of 1792. His body was never located.

Besides James Harrod and George Rogers Clark, another interesting person we learned about was Ann Kennedy Wilson Pogue Lindsay McGinty. Ann was the first home economics demonstrator in Kentucky. When she came over the Wilderness Road to Harrod's Fort, she brought her spinning wheel on her horse with her. She lived to a ripe old age, surviving FOUR husbands, and died in the fort blockhouse.


One of Ann McGinty's husbands was William Pogue. William was the handy-man at Harrod's Fort. He made spinning wheels and looms that kept his wife and the other women busy. He also made the first plow that turned the first bluegrass sod in Kentucky.


After taking in the fort, we visited the old cemetery. This was the oldest cemetery in the state, with over 500 pioneer sites. I loved looking at all of the old stones, trying to read any inscriptions. And finally, we enjoyed walking around one of the oldest and largest Osage orange trees in the country. VERY DIFFERENT!!!! I have already blogged about the Osage tree. Click
HERE to see that post.

The picture above is George inside of the George Rogers Clark Blockhouse. This is where Clark planned his conquest, which saved the Northwest Territory for his country. He presented his plans to Patrick Henry, Governor of Virginia, and was given the authority to proceed. More pictures are below.





Old Fort Harrod is a replica of the original fort.




I am standing at the McGinty Blockhouse. Talented woman, Ann McGinty, died here after outliving FOUR husbands.




George stands at the blacksmith shop.




Here is where Clark planned his conquest which saved the Northwest Territory.




This is the Mark McGohon Cabin with wife BETSY's cord cherry bed and her bonnet!





Capt. James Harrod and 32 men started Harrodstown. This is the schoolhouse where...





...George sits and recites his ABC's. Can you hear him??????? ha ha






Handyman William Pogue made spinning wheels with the help of his smart wife, Ann.






Rev. John Lythe, who carried a Bible in one hand and an axe in the other, lived here.




Here's one more peak at the fort before leaving. What an experience!

We hope YOU get to go to Harrodsburg sometime and enjoy this wonderful piece of history.

Hugs,


40 comments:

Darla said...

This does look like a very interesting place to visit. You and George take me so many beautiful places, THANKS!

Cher said...

interesting! the last photo is so beautiful! thank you for always bringing us to places you and George explore. you guys have a great weekend!

big hugs,
cher

Pam said...

I love visiting places like this!

Thistlebrooms said...

Always the 'Best' places to visit...
Love the Rev. John's kitchen photo and the Spinning Wheel...
I remember having a DIRT floor in the cellar of an old house where I lived and Believe Me it brought chills to me in the winter months... In return though, it also was a great place to store all our root veggies through those same months!!

Such a lovely trip you had...

Always~Marilyn

♥Kathy♥ said...

I love reading about books set around the Civil War time period. Very interesting post. Looks like you both enjoyed yourselfs. LOL at the picture of George doing his A,B,C's.

Beth said...

So interesting, Betsy! I especially love the image of Ann McGinty carrying her spinning wheel on her horse! And the preacher who carried a Bible in one hand and an axe in the other. I love details like that---they remind me that history is much livelier than the dry list of facts I was taught in school.

Great photos, by the way. I like the one of that smart schoolboy George. :-)

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

I can't help but think of all the hard work that went into building all these houses.The are simple yet rugged.Thanks for the info.
Blessings,Ruth

Susie said...

That looks like a fun place to explore Betsy. I like history lots more than I did as a student. Actually I hated history in school. Wish I had paid more attention now.

The Incredible Woody said...

That's what I love about travel on back roads - seeing the many things that you would otherwise miss!!

JOE TODD said...

What a great place to visit. Sometimes you just need to search them out and I'm so glad you did. I really enjoy history especially the civil war. On our trip to Florida I wanted to stop at Andersonville prison in Georgia but didn't have the chance.

Tracey Hodge said...

You guys rock! I love reading how and where you get around to!

Mandy in Mayberry said...

We would love that! Zach is really into history. Thanks for those great pictures.

Have a great weekend, Betsy!

Sandra said...

thanks for the history lesson and the photos are great. I lived in KY from age 9 to 15 and it was still peaceful and lush just like it was when they built this fort. I hope it still is. I left there in 1959 and have not seen the wonderful hills since.

Daisy said...

I enjoyed the trip back in time with you and George, but I'm very glad I didn't have to live back in those times. Have a good weekend, Betsy! :D

Kelly said...

...I remember visiting here as a little girl, and I know my parents have a photo of me wearing red cowgirl boots here! :-)

Roses and Lilacs said...

I've passed it many times but never stopped. Love old historical places. Glimpses back into the life our ancestors lived.
Marnie

Sunny said...

What a great place to visit, with so much history. I would love to visit that area someday.
Sunny :)

imac said...

Sounds like you had a great time there.

NCmountainwoman said...

We are history buffs as well and just love going to such places. Thanks for the tour.

Aren't you glad you don't have to cook with the fire and those utensils?

bookbabie said...

Love seeing the old buildings, it really makes me appreciate what we have now. I often tell my husband (who thinks I'm weird no doubt) how much I like indoor plumbing, heating, air conditioning, and garbage pick up. Maybe I lived back in the days of Fort Harrod in another life!

Small City Scenes said...

Thanks for the tour. I love history and when it the local stuff it is just great. I only wish back when I was in grade school history or rather the teachers could have made history more interesting. MB

Tricia said...

Did he sing his abc's? hehehe That's funny

1774?! 2 yrs before our Constitution was even signed! Gee-ma-nitly!

You guys get to visit such cool places, good for ya'll!

Pat - Arkansas said...

What an interesting place! Sorry to say I'd never before heard of Ft. Harrod.

Love, love, love your header photo! Perfect for Fall!

Katherine Aucoin said...

This was so interesting. I am really enjoying learning the history of this area.

Have you been to the Museum of Appalachia yet? This is probably a stupid questions ;-)

Kirigalpoththa said...

very interesting..thanks for sharing this :)

Karin said...

What a fascinating trip and so much to learn!!! I'm jealous - my hubby never wants to stop anywhere. He is a get-in-the-car-and-don't-even-stop-for-potty-breaks-kinds-guy! I've learned to accept it and insist on the weaker bladder needs a rest stop!!! LOL

Janie said...

This looks like an educational and fascinating place to visit! If we're ever in the neighborhood, I want to stop there.

Dorothy said...

What a neat piece of history! Great pictures you made to go with it, too!

Rose said...

Betsy, I just love this post....I always love visiting places like this. And I have really enjoyed your photos.

OH! I have been meaning to tell you I love the photo in your header.

A Brit in Tennessee said...

Ooh Betsy...my major was in history, and this is one of the reasons why. I just melt when I see pictures like these, there is definately a part of me that lives back in the era. I think it is all so interesting, a whole fort !!
Thanks for sharing your wonderful pictures with us, I'm going to put it on my list of to do's one day.
Hugs,
Jo

Robert V. Sobczak said...

Those are always the most peaceful moments, and good thing you turned around. That's how the best memories are made!

:: flyingstars :: said...

simply beautifully captured shots...looks a lovely place!

Cookie said...

Very neat. I wish I could take my kids here one day.

SquirrelQueen said...

I love places like this, it is always interesting to learn the history and get a feel of how our ancestors lived. Great photos Betsy, I'm really glad you and George turned around to explore.

Judy
PS, the little bird in my photo the other day is a Junco.

Valerie said...

What a great history lesson! Makes me want to find a book ( or internet site) to read more. I love (even though I know their lives were anything but) the simple look of life back then. No clutter, just what you needed for survival. Probably because that is what their days were full of, living in such a way to stay alive, instead finding ways to entertain themselves as they exsited. Thanks!

Busy Bee Suz said...

What a wonderful tour and history lesson Betsy.
I have to say, I would not want to go back and live in the past...the present is just TOO darn comfortable. :)

This Is My Blog - fishing guy said...

Betsy: That was such a fun experience at the fort, thanks for sharing George trying to get through the ABC's.

diane said...

Isn't it great to literally go back in time in these places. It looks a very interesting place and well done. I'll never get there but through you and blogging I can experience this bit of American history with you.

Pat @ Mille Fiori Favoriti said...

Besty, this was so interesting! Look how simply people lived in those days.

My husband and I enjoy learning history. We are volunteers ata Natonal Landmark historic cemetery in Brooklyn,NY, to help identify Civil War veterans, both Union and Confederate, that are buried there. I have written a few blog posts about that labled Green - Wood Cemetery. If the vetrans have no gravestone, or thier headstone is so weathered that it is unreadable, we order a new one from the Veteran's Administration. The volunteers have identified over 3,000 men so far!

Mary said...

George and Mike would hit is off great. Mike loves history, too. I like to absorb it by looking at it, but tend to only read parts and then forget them. We love walking around places like this, too.