Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Little Cabins in Cades Cove, TN

I have included the map of the Cades Cove Loop Road again in this post -so that you can see where the cabins are that I have chosen to share in today's blog. If you have not read any of the history of Cades Cove (which is in the Smoky Mountains), please click HERE. You can read some great information on that site.





This is the Dan Lawson Place (No. 14 on the map). Dan Lawson built this house in 1856, on land bought from his father-in-law, Peter Cable, whose home stood to the west, across the stream. The brick chimney, unusual for the time and locale, was built of bricks, made on the site.





This is the Carter Shields Cabin (No. 16 on the map). A wound suffered in the Battle of Shiloh left George Washington "Carter" Shields crippled for life. Shortly after the war, he married and moved to Kansas. He returned to Cades Cove in 1906 and bought this property in 1910. One would think that an old soldier could find contentment in such a lovely nook. But Shields lived here only 11 years before leaving again.




I love seeing Split Rail Fences --and the Smokies have alot of them... The Pioneers marked their property by using these fences. This particular fence was at the Carter Shields Cabin.




This is one of the most popular tourist places in Cades Cove --since this property contains a Grist Mill. I will have an entire post on this property. The house above is called the Gregg-Cable House (No. 11 on the map). Lawson Gregg bought an acre of land from John P. Cable in 1879, and built a small house on it with lumber sawed at Cable's mill. He later enlarged the house from time to time. He and his family lived in it, and operated a store on the first floor. This house is believed to be the first all-frame house in the Cove.




Here is the inside of the Gregg-Cable House. Looks like at one time, they had a fireplace --and then replaced it with a stove.

In 1887, Rebecca Cable and her brother Dan bought the house and an acre their father had sold to Gregg eight years earlier. They operated the store for about 8 more years, and then turned the house into a boarding house.

Rebecca Cable was a strong woman, and she operated the home and took care of her sick brother's children. She took care of the farm and cattle-raising chores and lived a long and successful life. She owned more than 600 acres of land. She died at the age of 96 in 1940. After her death, the house was moved from its original site on the Forge Creek Road to this location... (WOW---I like that woman!!)




I showed you this cabin in another post --but wanted to show you the cabin again. This is the John Oliver Cabin (No. 2 on the map). IF you haven't seen my other post talking about this cabin, click HERE.





Here's another Split Rail Fence... Do you really think that I like these fences???? I love them!!!! This fence is found at the Gregg-Cable House.

I hope you enjoyed seeing some of the little cabins at Cades Cove. My favorite is STILL the John Oliver Cabin since it is secluded at the bottom of the mountain....

Have a wonderful Wednesday. We're just doing what we can to stay COOL here.

Hugs,

57 comments:

Jane said...

Oh, I'm first in line on the comments today! Great stories and nic pics. Love to hear about very old homes!

Jane

Valerie said...

Those cabins are wonderful!. A better (yet harder) time in many ways. Your knowledge about all of these places amazes me. You are quite the historian Betsy!

Mildred said...

I love seeing the cabins and the split rail fences make beautiful photos too.
Hope you two have a wonderful day.

Catherine said...

Those split rail fences are very rustic and lovely! The little cabins remind me of Little House on The Prairie. I used to love that show.

Isn't it amazing to think of huge families living in those little cabins and now we have little families living in huge mansions. I think our perception of 'needed space' has changed! :)

Happy Day Betsy!
xo Catherine

Arkansas Patti said...

It has been a while since I have been to Cades Cove and thanks so much for the reminders.
I kind of hate that Gregg-Cable House has been painted white. Nice for today but really takes away the "old" feel.

Neal said...

I, like you, love split rail fences. Old cabins always interest me also. I always wonder what kind of stories they could tell if they could talk.

Beth said...

Hi, Betsy! I appreciate the fact that you so often give the historical background of a place you've visited---it makes all those wonderful pictures really come alive. Your posts about Cade's Cove have really made me want to go there---hope to soon. I'll think of you and George when I do. :-)

We're trying to stay cool, too...and hoping for rain. I'm excited to hear that it may really feel like fall around these parts next week.

RH (aka Lucy) said...

I want to transport myself through the photos and live in any one of those cabins the rest of my entire life! I just love these pictures and wisshhhh I was there.

Ann said...

These cabins are really small.

I was in a small one when I was helping out in my husband PhD thesis. We were up the mountain, sleeping in single bunk beds. It was very very cold.

I told my husband, i still tell him, he owed it to me. It was such a miserable field trip. It was freezing as as students, we didn't have a good sleeping bag and I wore my friend's ill fitting gum boot when we were walking in the river.

diane said...

They a lovely little cabins and I love those fences. Are the cabins used?

Susie said...

Hey Betsy I like learning about the people who lived in the cabins. That Cable lady was a strong lady.

Thanks for the info on these cute little cabins.

Sandra said...

you know i am a big fan of cabins and fences and this post has lots and lots of both. I love that fence shot. and the cabins appeal to me much more than the big house. its beautiful, but i would love to live in one of the cabins. of course with AC/Heat.

Pam said...

A wonderful view into the people who settled beautiful Cades Cove. It was a hard life but Rebecca was strong and lived well into her 90's.

Lovely photos and nicely told, Betsy :)

Dorothy said...

Thanks for posting more about Cades Cove! I like those split rail fences, too. It's amazing to think about families living in such close quarters!!

Linda (PA_shutterbug) said...

Nice pictures of the cabins and the split rail fences. I enjoyed reading the stories about the families who lived in the cabins too. I noticed one of the residents had "George Washington" in his name. Years ago it was popular to include president's names as part of your child's name. My dad was named Herbert Hoover "Herb". He was born when Herbert Hoover was in office.

Cicero Sings said...

I like the split rail fences too. We have a good number of them in our area too.

Tricia said...

The history of places like that fascinate me... I love history! And I love those fences too, they fit so well w/ these old places!!! Very nice post, Betsy!

Fred Alton said...

Very interesting that the Cable home switched from the fireplace to the wood stove. I've been thinking of switching from gas to wood - it would give me heat, and a flat place to cook a pot of beans and coffee! Plus - the wood is free. But then again, it's mighty handy to just turn the knob on the gas fireplace and enjoy instant heat.

KathyA said...

Can you imagine cooking on that stove!
For all she did, it amazes me that she lived to 96. Must have been from good stock.

Aunt Amelia's Attic said...

A rather small area, so rich in History!!!

From the Kitchen said...

Is the fence keeping you out or keeping you in? I like those split rail fences too. And I've enjoyed my visit to Cade's Cove. Next time, let's have a picnic!!

Best,
Bonnie

A Brit in Tennessee said...

Ooh, such wonderful little log cabins, and the old grist mill is gorgeous.
We have decided the remainder of the split-rail fencing is to be laid out in the zig-zag fashion, just like the fence in your picture.
Isn't it splendid !!
What a fun trip....

Gary Orona said...

It's always nice to see and experience a bit of history. Nice post, Betsy!

Kirigalpoththa said...

Nice little cabins. You have a very detailed knowledge of these places. Great!

Sunny said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Sunny said...

Lovely little cabins filled with history, and I LOVE old wooden fences, the zig zag split rail is one of my favorites.
☼ Sunny

Debbie Smith said...

Hi Betsy!
It's always so amazing to me how the early settlers built and lived in these wonderful cabins. Love the spli rail fences also.
Sorry that I have been out of touch. I started my treatments last Tuesday and time just gets away from me. I leave at 1pm to be at the clinic by 1:30 and then my afternoon is pretty shot. I've been feeling fantastic with no real side effects, other then I'm really tired when I get home. I go everyday for my treatments.
I hope to be able to get some more writing done soon, Watery Wednesday has been about all I can muster up these days.
Thank you so much for asking, I am doing really great!!
Have a fantastic day!
Debbie

The Incredible Woody said...

The John Oliver cabin has always been my favorite as well! Another great side road is Parson Branch. It connects to Hwy 129. A great meander thru the mountains!

reanaclaire said...

Yes, Betsy..they are very nice.. looks comfortable too in their own ways...

Ginny said...

Cabins are all so different. I have a lot of cabin pictures to post sometime, and love snapping them. They are very willing subjects. The Dan Lawson Cabin (the first one) is the plainest I've seen. But here's what intrigues me about it. The huge window in front. All the cabins I've seen have little tiny wondows, don't know why! Maybe glass was too expensive. Why do you think?

Lon Anderson said...

I really like the picture of this cabin you took, Betsy, great photo!

Rose said...

thanks for your comment on my post re history of my home. i love it,b ut you are lucky having the experience of traveling and seeing this wonderful history. this is what i like to do. thanks for the photos. rose

Pat Tillett said...

Great photo-tour Betsy!
What a fantastic place. My mind is going crazy with images of how it was to live there when they were built. We really have it made now....thanks!

Kay said...

I've said it before and I'll say it again, you live in a place with so much history. I would love so much to visit these places.
Kay

imac said...

Home from Home then lol.

~mel said...

Thanks for the tour once again, and for the little history lesson. I too love the look of those split rail fences ~ great picture of you by it!

nanny said...

aren't those fences great? I love these shots!!

Have a geat day!

Together We Save said...

You are really making me want to take a trip to Cades Cove!! I would love to visit these cabins again.

Jen said...

Great tour Betsy.
I love my cabin and am grateful I don't have the chores those folks had while they lived in theirs!

LV said...

Thanks for another great trip to Cades Cove. You should sell some of your pictures. You do an amazing job. I am having a hard time commenting. Had my eyes dilated today.

Mary Isabella and Kiley too! said...

OOOOOH I do love split rail fences and the old homes. I is way too hot here also. Have a wonderful week....m...

Dylan said...

Such beauty and peace!

Linda said...

I love old rail fences of any kind......AND stone fireplaces.

Wendy said...

What an interesting place you live in, Betsy! I love those log cabins, rich with history too. Thanks for sharing!

Diane said...

Nice post, Betsy. So many of our ancestors began in these kind of old cabins, which were palaces at THAT time! I was surprised that the split rail fence was so low - you could step over it. I thought they would be taller. Diane

eileeninmd said...

Great post and photos on the cabins, Betsy! I was there so long ago I do not remember the cabins.

Kelly said...

...great post. I want to go there again. I was there as a kid. My cousin (who is a Shields) is remotely related to Carter Shields!

Pat @ Mille Fiori Favoriti said...

Interesting cabins and house Betsy. I like to imagine what life was like living in such dwellings. It's nice that they are being preserved for future generations.
The split rail fences are marvels, aren't they? They are very picturesque and so are you!

Deb said...

What a time capsule this place is. Although I see the picturesque charm, I also see a very hard life. Struggles, I'm sure, greater than we can envision. Strong people, and an important piece of history to preserve. Amazing, really.

Rose said...

thanks for your comment re Berry College. it's a small world. glad you wet to Tenn. and met your future husband. take care. rose

Carletta said...

Arg! Blogger just ate my comment with that service unavailable message again.
Your post takes me right to my favorite spot in the Smokies!
As much as these scenes are idyllic to our eyes I can't imagine what life was like for them in the winter.
Lovely images Betsy!

SquirrelQueen said...

A visit to Cades Cove is like stepping back in time. I love those old cabins but like you the split rail fences are my favorite.

I remember the old grist mill and look forward to you post about the property.

It has cooled off over our way, I would send you some cooler air if I could.

Daisy said...

It's neat to see these old cabins and fences, Betsy! Thank you for sharing the pictures. I always get to go traveling with you when I come here. :D

Ruthi said...

awesome... those fences are so unique, i have not seen anything like it before. and that cabin... oh i would love to spend a week vacation in there or camp out in that beautiful scenery. looks so peaceful.

misslynda said...

I think the wood stove is better heat for the house plus they could cook on it. Love the pictures as always.

Rose said...

Oh, Betsy, I so enjoyed this. What a life it must have been to live here back then.

Janie said...

So interesting to see the old cabins and fences! Great photos, Betsy. Seeing them makes me feel like I've stepped into the past.