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Friday, March 5, 2010

Hoarfrost at Mt. Magazine, AR


On another day during our wonderful Arkansas trip, we drove west from Mt. Nebo to visit Mt. Magazine. Mt. Magazine is the highest mountain in Arkansas and is now a state park with gorgeous overlooks, hiking trails, great waterfalls, a lodge with restaurant, cabins, etc. Mt. Magazine towers over the Petit Jean River Valley to the south, and the Arkansas River Valley to the north. We have been there several times and enjoy its beauty each and every time.

Someone asked how Mt. Magazine got its name---so I did some research. French explorers in the 1600's thought that the mountain looked like a BARN (French word for barn is magasin) from a distance. (Personally, I never think of a mountain looking like a barn---but what do I know???? ha)

This year, we found a fabulous surprise when we got to the top of the mountain. There was hoarfrost all over the trees ---and it was a gorgeous sight to behold. I looked up some information about hoarfrost and here are some of the definitions and information I found:
-Frozen dew that forms a white coating on a surface; also called white frost;
-Ice Crystals forming a white deposit;
-The deposition of hoarfrost is similar to the process by which dew is formed, except that the temperature of the frosted object must be below freezing. It forms when air with a dew point below freezing is brought to saturation by cooling.

Today, I'll share some pictures of the hoarfrost that we took on that gorgeous day at Mt. Magazine. Above is a picture of the trees that we saw---as we got to the top of the mountain that day. Can you imagine how excited we were to see the hoarfrost!! Below are more.





It was interesting to see the hoarfrost clinging to some things --and not touching other things.





The rock shelves and bluffs on Mt. Magazine fascinate me. I read that over time sediment was formed. Then the sediment particles were compacted and glued together to form sandstones, siltstones and shale. Aren't the rocks interesting? I love the lichen which forms the colors also.






Instead of looking at the view of the valley below, I was more interested in taking pictures of the hoarfrost on the mountain!!! As you can tell, the frost was only above a certain elevation.





Here's a close-up picture of the hoarfrost ---which was clinging to only one side of each stem.






We walked down a long set of steps to the overlook ---to get more pictures. Ask George just how COLD it was at that overlook!!!! (Our coats were in the car!!! Duh!)






Here's another close-up picture of some of the bluffs on that mountain. You can also see some icicles toward the left side.





I like this picture showing the 'white-capped' trees ---against that beautiful blue sky.

Mt. Nebo, Mt. Magazine and Petit Jean are all terrific state parks---and we highly recommend them if you are ever in that area.

Hugs,